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This page contains information about:: Italian Phone Conversation, Past Tense, Italian Present Perfect, Interrogative, Italian Questions, Possessive Adjectives, Italian Possessive Pronouns, Direct Object Pronouns, and some Italian Expressions.


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Level I

Lesson1: Italian Present Tense, Plural, Articles, Italian Numbers, Alphabet

Lesson2: Italian Irregular Verbs, Italian Reflexive Verbs

Lesson3: Italian Past Participle, Comparative, Superlative, Demonstrative Pronouns

Lesson4: Italian Past Tense, Present Perfect, Interrogative, Possessive, Pronouns

Lesson5: Italian Prepositions, Model Verbs, Italian Future Tense

Lesson6: Italian Adjectives, Negation, Past Perfect in Italian

Lesson7: Italian Gerund Imperative and Adverbs

Level II

Lesson1: Italian Past Tense, Imperfetto, Perfect, and Remote Past

Lesson2: Conditional, Italian Idioms and Proverbs

Lesson3: Subjunctive, More Italian Idioms, Proverbs, and Essential Dictionary

Lesson4: Italian Conjunctions, Italian Ci and Ne, and More Italian Vocabulary

Lesson5: Surviving in Italy, Eating, Drinking in Italy. More Italian Words To Know.

Lesson6: Getting Around Italy Transport, Italian Trains, Buses, and Traffic

Lesson7: Italian False Friends, Wrong Italian Words in English

Italian Expressions

Emergency in Italy

Hotel, Museum, Guided Tour, Shopping

Sentence Quiz

How to Learn a Language


Italian Lesson 4

 

Italian Phone Conversation

Phone Conversation:

Speak7 -- Pronto!

Antonio-- Pronto, chi parla?

Speak7 -- Mi chiamo Speak7 , vorrei parlare con Marco

Antonio -- Attenda prego... glielo passo…

Marco-- Pronto, chi è?

Speak7 -- Pronto, sono Speak7 .

Marco-- Ciao Speak7 ! Come stai?

Speak7 -- Bene, grazie!

Marco-- Posso aiutarti?

Speak7 -- Si, come dite ‘I lost my wallet” in italiano?

 

Pronto: hello (on the phone)/ chi: who/ vorrei: I would like/ posso: can I/

 

Italian Past Tense

 

In Italian you can only make the past tense by combining (the auxiliary + the past participle), it’s not that complicated, it’s almost like English, almost the same way you make the present perfect to express something that happened in the past, you can say in English: I wrote a book, or I’ve written a book, in Italian you can only say I’ve written the book.

 

Italian Past Tense

Ho

Hai

Ha

Abbiamo

Avete

Hanno

~ato (with ~are verbs)

 

~uto (with ~ere verbs)

 

~ito (with ~ire verbs)

Sono

Sei

È

Siamo

Siete

Sono

~ato/a/i/e (with ~are verbs)

 

~uto/a/i/e (with ~ere verbs)

 

~ito/a/i/e (with ~ire verbs)

 

 

 

 

Italian Present Perfect

avere vs essere

“avere” Verbs

“essere” Verbs

“avere” & “essere” Irregulars

Pronoun

Parlare

(to speak)

Sapere

(to know)

Finire

(to finish)

Partire

(to go)

Vedere

(to see)

Nascere

(to be born)

I

You

He/She

We

You

They

Io

Tu

Lui/ lei

Noi

Voi

Loro

Ho parlato

Hai parlato

Ha parlato

Abbiamo parlato

Avete parlato

Hanno parlato

Ho saputo

Hai saputo

Ha saputo

Abbiamo saputo

Avete saputo

Hanno saputo

Ho finito

Hai finito

Ha finito

Abbiamo finito

Avete finito

Hanno finito

Sono partito

Sei partito

È partito

Siamo partiti

Siete partiti

Sono partiti

Ho visto

Hai visto

Ha visto

Abbiamo visto

Avete visto

Hanno visto

Sono nato

Sei nato

È nato

Siamo nati

Siete nati

Sono nati

               

 

As you may have noticed in the table above, most verbs are conjugated with “avere”, however some verbs are conjugated with “essere”.

As I have mentioned in the “past participle” lesson, regular form simply add (~ato, ~uto, ~ito) to the stem of verbs, depending on the type of verbs, if the verbs in the infinitive ends with ~are, then  add ~ato: parlato (the verb parlare), add ~uto to the verbs ending with ~ere: creduto (the verb credere), and finally add ~ito to verbs ending in their infinitive with ~ire: partito (the verb partire)

Note that some verbs take their past participle with the verb “avere”, while some other verbs take their past participle with the verb essere (usually motion verbs)

Also note that the past participle of verbs associated with “essere” should agree with the number and gender, so for example partito (gone) can also be sono partita (I went, for a female)/ siamo partiti (we men went…)/ siete partite (you females went)

Verbs going with “avere” don’t have to agree with the number and gender, look at the examples in the table above.

Remember: to form the past participle with verbs conjugated with “essere” the gender and number matter, but not with verbs conjugated with “avere”.

 

Irregular Forms: memorize the verbs that take irregular forms in the past participle such as:

 

Verb/ Past participle /English

Fare: fatto (done)

Aprire: aperto (opened)

Chiedere: chiesto (asked)

Chiudere: chiuso (closed)

Coprire: coperto (covered)

Dare: dato (given)

Dire: detto (said)

Leggere: letto (read)

Mettere: messo (put)

Offrire: offerto (offered)

Perdere: perso (lost)

Prendere: preso (taken)

Scrivere: scritto (written)

Spendere: speso (spent)

Vedere: visto (seen)

Vivere: vissuto (lived)

Rompere: rotto (broken)

 

 

So you don’t have to add (ato, uto, ito) to these verbs on the top, take their whole new form and place an auxiliary verb “avere” or “essere” before them.

 

Verbs that go with “essere”, most of them are verbs of motion…here is a list:

 

Italian Verbs with Essere

Verb

Translation

Past Participle

andare

to go

andato

arrivare

to arrive

arrivato

cadere

to fall

caduto

diventare

to become

diventato

entrare

to enter

entrato

essere

to be

stato

morire

to die

morto

nascere

to be born

nato

partire

to leave

partito

rimanere

to remain

rimasto

salire

to get into

salito

scendere

to get out of

sceso

succedere

to happen

successo

tornare

to return

tornato

uscire

to go out

uscito

venire

to come

venuto

 

Except these verbs on the top, 90% of the rest of verbs go with “avere”.

Non ho mai visitato Roma. (I’ve never visited Rome)

Dove hai passato le vacanze? (where have you spent your vacation?)

Ho visto un film davvero interessante la settimana scorsa (I watched a very interesting movie last week)

Sono nato negli USA (I was born in the U.S)

Siamo nati in Spagna (we were born in Spain)

 

 

Italian Interrogative

 

To make a question in Italian you simply need to add a question mark to the sentence, if you’re speaking then just add a tone to your words.

However you need to know some other forms, you can make a question in three ways:

Hicham ha un cane? (does Hicham have a dog?)
Ha un cane Hicham? (does Hicham have a dog?)
Ha Hicham un cane? (does Hicham have a dog?)

 

Also you may need some interrogative pronouns and interrogative prepositions to help you make questions:

 

Who? Chi?

Whose? Di chi?

Where? Dove?

What? Che cosa?

What? Che?

What? Cosa?

Why? Perchè?

When? Quando?

How? Come?

How much? Quanto?

Which? Quale?

To whom…? A chi…?

With whom? Con chi…?

Where …from..? Di dove…?

 

Note: if (dove, come, quale) are followed by (è), then they drop their final e and add ‘è

Like (dov’è, com’è) quale adds only the è so it becomes qual è

Chi sono io? (Who I am?)

Cosa dici? (What are you saying?)

Come stai? (How are you?)

Qual è il suo nome? (What’s your name?)

Di dove sei? (Where are you from?)

Dove vivi? (Where do you live?)

Quanti anni hai? (How old are you?)

Come si dice quella cosa in italiano? (How do you say that thing in Italian?)

Cosa significa "scusami" in inglese? (How do you say “scusami” in English?)

Che ore sono? (What time i sit?)

Ti piace qui? (Do you like it here?)

 

 

Italian Possessive Pronoun

most of the time the article (il/la/i/le) should be used before the possessive form, example:

il mio libro (my book)

la mia casa è dove sono felice (my house is where I’m happy)

However you may use the possessive form without its preceding article (il/la/i/le) in these cases:

-Before family relation words in the singular. “mio padre” (my father)

-When the pronoun follows the verb "essere", "Questa è mia" (this is mine)

-When the adjective follows the noun it refers to, "Questi sono libri miei" (these are my books)

 

Possessive Adjective

Preposition object

Italian Possessive Pronoun

 

Direct

Indirect

 

Singular possessive

Plural possessive

Io

Tu

Lui/ lei

Noi

Voi

Loro

Mi

Ti

Lo/ la

Ci

Vi

Li/ le

 

Mi

Ti

Gli/ le

Ci

Vi

Loro

 

Me

Te

Lui/ lei

Noi

Voi

Loro

 

My/mine

Your/ Yours

His/Her/Hers

Our/ Ours

Your/ Yours

Their/ Theirs

il mio

il tuo

il suo

il nostro

il vostro

il loro

la mia

la tua

la sua

la nostra

la vostra

la loro

i miei

i tuoi

i suoi

i nostri

i vostri

i loro

le mie

le tue

le sue

le nostre

le vostre

le loro

                 

 

Italian Direct Object Pronouns

 

They are similar to reflexive pronouns, except in the third person singular and plural ("si"). Object pronouns have two forms: one is used when the pronoun is placed before the verb form or combined with it, the other when the pronoun is placed after the verb. 

Object pronouns can replace more than one word or an entire sentence, and both direct and indirect pronouns go directly in front of the verb, except loro, which always follows the verb.

ti amo (I love you), la amo (I love her), mi ami (you love me).

With infinitives or participles, the pronoun (except loro) follows it and is written as one word. Posso studiarla oggi (I can study it today)

In the negative form, "non" precede the pronoun placed in front of verb. Non la posso studiare oggi (I can’t study it today)

In case you have more than one pronoun, the indirect comes before the direct.  Ti amo, te lo dico adesso (I love you, I tell it to you now)

 

Confusion Issues:

 

Don’t confuse;

E’: is

Che : what

Da’: verb (he gives)

La’: there

Se’: himself/ Herself

Si’: yes

With:

E: and

Che : that

Da: from

La: the (feminine)

Se: if

Si: himself (reflexive)

 

 

 

Writing training: write the same conversation which was between Speak7 and Antonio, but this time you and an imaginary person, try to look up info that you don’t know their translation in Italian, apply some of the grammar you learned, and see how it goes J

Speaking training: try to read the conversation you just wrote out loud, train yourself well, you might need that for a real conversation in the future.

 

 

This table has some useful expression that might help you expend your knowledge of Italian:

 

Italian Expressions

It's a deal

Affare fatto

it's bad (weather)

Fa brutto tempo

it's cold (weather)

Fa freddo

it's cool (weather)

Fa fresco

it's foggy (weather)

C'è la nebbia

it's freezing (weather)

Fa un freddo gelido

it's hot (weather)

Fa caldo

it's humid (weather)

È umido

It's me

Sono io

It's nice (weather)

Fa bel tempo

it's raining (weather)

Piove

it's snowing

Nevica

it's stormy

Il tempo è tempestoso

it's sunny

C'è il sole

It's urgent.

E’ urgente

it's windy

Tira vento

It's worth it

Vale la pena

It's your turn!

Tocca a te!

I've Been Learning Italian For 1 Month

Sto imparando l'italiano da un mese.

I've got a cold.

Ho preso il raffreddore.

I've got a headache/sore throat/ stomachache.

Ho mal di testa/gola/stomaco.

January 6 wish

Buona Befana

Just a Little.

Solo un po'.

Keep calm! Calm down!

Calma! Calmati!

Leave me alone

Lasciami stare

Let’s go/have something to eat?

Andiamo?/Andiamo a mangiare qualcosa?

Let's go home.

Andiamo a casa.

Let's see.

Vediamo.

Listen!

Ascolti/a/ate!

Look!

Guarda!

Lucky you

Buon per te

Lucky you!

Beato/a (te, lui, lei) Beati/e (voi loro)

Make yourself at home

Faccia come se fosse a casa sua/ Mettiti comodo

May I come in?

Posso entrare?

May I help you?

Posso aiutarLa?

May I help you?

Posso esserle utile?

May I talk to...

Potrei parlare con...

May I?

Potrei?

Me/ You.  Him/ Her.

io/ tu, voi (you polite). Lui/ Lei 

Merry Christmas

Buon Natale

Mind your business

Fatti gli affari tuoi

Mr.../ Mrs.…/ Miss…

Signor…/Signora…(usually for both Mrs. & Ms)

Much better

Molto meglio

My feet hurt.

Mi fanno male i piedi.

My Italian Is Bad.

Il mio italiano è orribile.

My name is ..., I would like to talk to ...

Mi chiamo ..., vorrei parlare con...

My Name Is ….

Mi chiamo ...

My pleasure

Con piacere/ Piacere mio

Never mind

Non importa

Next!

Il prossimo! / Sotto a chi tocca!

 

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